But information has been slow to emerge and communicati

  ion with affected areas remains limited. On Monday, Mozambican President Filipe Nyusi said that “everyth

ing indicates that we can have a record of more than 1,000 dead” — a figure that some experts now believe could be conservative.

  The mortuary at the central hospital in Beira “is full and dozens of bodies need to be

removed and handled in a dignified way,” according to IFRC. Beira is still flooded, which makes it impossible to bury bodies, IFRC said.

  It is premature to say how many people have died while affected areas remain i

naccessible, Stephen Fonseca, regional forensics manager at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), told CNN.

  On Friday morning ICRC set up a new base in Chimoio, near the border with Zimbabw

e. Fonseca said identifying victims is “a monumental task” that will take months or years rather than days or weeks.

  ”The agony of not knowing what happened to your loved one in a disaster like Cyclone Idai is

indescribable,” Diane Araujo, an ICRC delegate deployed to Beira, said in a statement Friday.

www.aishedesa.com

With UK politics in disarray, there’s still a risk the country

  will leave the European Union without a transitional deal to protect trade. The Ba

nk of England has said the fallout from that scenario would be worse than the 2008 financial crisis.

  The big Brexit slowdown

  The United Kingdom was the fastest growing G7 economy when voters went to the polls in 2016. E

mergency action by the Bank of England helped the UK economy avoid the recession that some had

predicted would follow a vote in favor of Brexit, and unemployment remains very low.

  But the country still fell toward the bottom of the G7 rank

ing. Economic growth has slumped from an annual pace of around 2% to less than 1% now.

  Investment by UK companies stalled after the referendum and then plunged 3.7% in 2018. Me

anwhile, the rest of the G7 has seen business investment grow around 6% a year since the vote.

www.aishedesc.com

He said he was asked by his employer to stay home for

mental illness and not go back to work until he recovered.”The utmost goal is like Zhuge Liang (of the Three Kingd

oms), who became a senior official to serve the country,” Shen said. “What comes second is to be like Du Fu (a reno

wned poet in Tang Dynasty known for his patriotism), who always puts the country’s and the people’s interests first.”

“Over the past 26 years, no one from the office has ever asked about me,” Shen told Red

Star News. The auditing office of Xuhui district hasn’t responded to comment as of press time.

Shen also denied online rumors that he graduated from Fudan University and once lost a daughter to a car crash.

“I have never been married, so how could I have a daughter,” he retorted. “Me, a Fudan graduate? Fudan was far out of my league.”

After days of being bombarded with visits and interviews from curious citizens or online streamers, who

are tapping into his sudden popularity for public exposure, Shen said he hopes he can be left alone so as to read more books.

www.sh419in.com

Purrfect! A smart shelter powered by AI keeps stray cats warm in

A constant temperature of 27 degrees, a water bowl that never freezes, a comfy mat, and no dogs allowed.

Those are the amenities for felines in a neighborhood in Beijing’s Sh

unyi district, where stray cats can loll around contentedly all winter, nibbling food and sipp

ing water, safe from the weather and provided with love through an artificial intelligence platform. It is purrfection.

Wan Xi, an engineer at Baidu Brain-the open AI platform of Baidu-had the idea of build

ing a smart shelter for strays when he found a kitten huddled on his car tire in the winter of 2017.

Winter is rough for stray animals, as they require extra calories to stay warm. Only around 40 perc

ent of stray cats find enough food and shelter to make it through the harsh temperatures.

Although volunteers offer water, food and even heating pads to stray animals, Beijing’s freezin

g winters can turn a bowl of water into ice before a cat can drink. Many stray cats don’t live more than two ye

ars. Those that are not neutered or spayed face more health problems and spawn more homeless cats.

sh419vc.com

Stunning subway station lights up Chongqings a train leaving a

  The question many New Zealanders are asking themselves in the wake of Friday’s deadly terrorist attacks on two mosques is: Why?

  Why was this island nation with fewer than 5 million people in the southwestern c

orner of the Pacific chosen for such a savage crime? Why should there be attacks on men, women an

d children who have gathered to pray? Why couldn’t the white supremacist be prevented from going on the killing spree?

  In native Maori language New Zealand is “Aotearoa”, or roughly the “land of the long w

hite cloud” which appeared to offer a quiet sanctuary from many of the evils that beset our world today.

  All that changed last Friday. By a crime of pure hate.

  The brutality of the attacks in Christchurch has stunned New Zealanders. It

was the sort of thing that happened in “other places”. They thought their land is a “proud nation” of more than 200 ethnic gr

oups and 160 languages-a land of diversity in which “we share common values”, as Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has said.

sh419af.com

He went into hiding in 1996 and was finally arrested in 2008

Serbian capital, Belgrade. Karadzic was heavily disguised by a white beard, long

hair and spectacles, living under a false identity as a “spiritual healer.”

Karadzic is the highest-ranking political figure to have been brought to justice over the bitter ethnic conflicts of the 1990s.

Wednesday’s judgement was handed down by the UN’s international residual mechanism for cr

iminal tribunals, which deals with cases left over from the now dissolved courts for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.

In November 2017 the court also sentenced former Bosnian Serb army leader Ratko Mladi

c to life in prison after finding him guilty of genocide for atrocities committed during the Bosnian war from 1992 to 1995.

Mladic was charged with two counts of genocide and nine crim

es against humanity and war crimes for his role in the conflict in the former Yugoslavia fro

m 1992 to 1995, during which 100,000 people were killed and another 2.2 million displaced.

www.goshlf419.com

Indian billionaire arrested in London over alleged $2B fraud

K police have arrested India’s billionaire diamond dealer Nirav Modi

in London over his alleged involvement in a bank fraud that could be worth $2 billion.

Modi was arrested Tuesday on “behalf of the Indian authorities,” acco

rding to a statement from London’s Metropolitan Poli

ce, and is set to appear at Westminster Magistrates’ Court Wednesday.

Punjab National Bank, one of India’s largest, reported fraudulent activity at one of its branches more than a year ago.

India then issued an Interpol Red Notice for Modi’s arrest and London authorities were asked to pr

oceed with it, said a spokesperson for India’s Enforcement Directorate. The Indian foreign ministry sai

d in a statement it welcomed the arrest, and would seek to extradite Modi as soon as possible.

goshlf419.com

No-deal Brexit happens next week and no one knows if the EU

is deep into its most crucial week since the last one.

On Thursday, Theresa May travels to Brussels to meet with the remaining 27 EU leaders, where she is expected to request an extension to Article 50, the legal

process by which Britain is leaving the EU. If the EU27 agree, as they probably will, Brexit will be delayed beyond the current deadline of March 29. Lea

ving aside the gravity of this epic failure of British Brexit policy, the key question is how long will the delay last?

There are two likely options. The first is a short delay, which Downing Street said on Wedne

sday it would request. This would give the UK government a little more time to get its Withdrawal Agr

eement through Parliament, perhaps sweetened with some changes to the accompanying political declaration.

Or, the EU could offer May a much longer extension, possibly lasting years, to give to the UK more breathing space in which to u

ntangle its Brexit mess. The EU says it would only grant a longer delay if there was a good reason for doing so.

shb419.com

But Bercow ruled that, according to parliamentary proc

  edure, the government could not repeatedly put a motion before lawmakers if it had been previously rejected in the same session.

  May’s deal suffered a second, crushing defeat last week when it was rejected by 149 votes.

  ”What the government cannot legitimately do is resubmit to the House the same pr

oposition — or substantially the same proposition — as that of last week, which was

rejected by 149 votes,” Bercow said in an unannounced statement on Monday.

  Third time lucky for Theresa May’s Brexit vote?

  Bercow said that, in his view, the first two motions on May’s Brexit deal were sufficiently different not to have broken parliamentary convention.

  The speaker did not set out what tests the government would have to meet if it was to succ

essfully submit its deal for a third vote, saying only it would have to be “fundamentally different.”

  In response, a Downing Street spokesperson said, “We note the speaker’s statement. This is a statement that requires proper consideration.”

www.nanj419sn.com

The day after the attack in Christchurch, Ardern wore a h

  ijab as she stood in the center of a room, surrounded by families desperate to hear words of reassurance. They were tired, worried and m

any were grieving loved ones presumed killed in the hail of bullets fired by a man who singled them out for their beliefs.

  Even before she said a word, Ardern’s simple decision to cover

her hair served to show families she respected them and wanted to ease their pain.

  ”People were quite surprised. I saw people’s faces when she was wearing the hijab — th

ere were smiles on their faces,” said Ahmed Khan, a survivor of the attack who lost his uncle at the Al Noor mosque.

  Ali Akil, a member of Syrian Solidarity New Zealand who came to Christc

hurch to support the community, said wearing the hjiab was “a symbolic thing.”

  ”It’s saying I respect you, what you believe, and I’m here to help,” he said. “I’m very impressed.”

www.nj419yw.com